Posts Tagged ‘steve carlton’

Top 10 Philly Athletes of the Past 50 Years: One Man’s View

July 28th, 2019 by Jim Chesko | No Comments | Filed in Baseball, Basketball, Eagles, Flyers, General, Hockey, Phillies, Sixers

Philadelphia’s been the home base for a great number of incredible athletes over the years, but who are the best of the best?

If you’re a faiBobby Clarke and Bernie Parentthful viewer of Comcast SportsNet (I admit, I’m a heavy watcher), you know that CSN has recently been counting down its list of the Top 10 Philly Athletes of all time. (In case you haven’t been paying attention, Numbers 10 through 4 were Bernie Parent, Chuck Bednarik, Carl Lewis, Julius Erving, Steve Van Buren, Joe Frazier and Steve Carlton; will the final trio be Clarkie, Schmidty and Wilt? We shall see.)

Anyway, it got me thinking about MY list. First, however, the parameters: I decided to limit my Top 10 to players whom I’ve seen in action during the past the 50 years and who’ve played the bulk of their career in Philadelphia. So, no Jimmie Foxx or Lefty Grove (way before my time), no Pete Rose (despite how much he meant to the Phils’ 1980 World Series team), no Steve van Buren or Chuck Bednarik (amazing careers for both, but – again – before my time), no Richie Ashburn … and no Kobe Bryant.

Before giving you my personal Top 10, how about a few Philly greats who just missed the cut? Getting “honorable mention” status would be Charles Barkley, Brian Dawkins and – although he spent just four of his prime NBA years as a 76er – Moses Malone. All right, here goes…

10) JOE FRAZIER – Philly’s greatest boxer, “Smokin’ Joe” was an Olympic gold medalist and undisputed World Heavyweight Champion from 1970 to 1972, who had those three memorable battles with Muhammad Ali. Career record of 32-4-1.

9) CARL LEWIS – The Willingboro, New Jersey, sprinter and long-jumper won nine Olympic gold medals and an additional eight World Championship gold medals in the 1980s and 90s. (We won’t penalize Lewis for his inglorious 1993 attempt at singing the national anthem at a Bulls-Nets NBA playoff game.)

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Steve Carlton vs. Mike Schmidt

June 26th, 2019 by Kyle Lutz | Comments Off on Steve Carlton vs. Mike Schmidt | Filed in Baseball, General, MLB, Phillies, Sports

Both are Hall-of-Famers, both are two of the best players in Phillies’ history and both had legendary careers, but who’s better? I feel Carlton is, for the record.

(Bill Ingraham/AP Photo)

The bias towards Schmidt in this town is interesting, especially since everybody hated him during his playing career. Now it’s the complete opposite, and not at a healthy medium either, like it probably should be. Sure, I love Schmidt myself for what he’s done for this organization, although I never got to see him play, unfortunately. And there’s no denying that he’s one of the best ever at the hot corner, if not the best; both offensively and defensively. Schmidt’s a likable guy as well, which makes it even easier to respect his playing-career accomplishments.

As for Carlton, he won 329 major-league games, 241 of them coming as a Phillie. He had a respectable winning percentage of 57.4, and struck out over 4,000 batters in 24 years in the majors. 15 out of his 24 major-league seasons were spent with Philadelphia, from 1972-86. Impressively, he won 20 or more games in his career six times, four of which culminated with a Cy-Young victory.

Carlton’s ranked 11th all-time in major-league victories, and second all-time among left handers (only Warren Spahn has more victories for a southpaw, with 363). Carlton became a first-ballot Hall-of-Famer in 1994, earning an impressive 95.6% of the vote. Schmidt was inducted a year later, earning a equally-impressive 96.5% of the vote, as a first-ballot Hall-of-Famer as well.

Individual accomplishments aside, back to the debate.

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Steve Carlton or Randy Johnson? Who was the better Pitcher??

April 10th, 2014 by Kyle Lutz | 1 Comment | Filed in Baseball, General, MLB, Phillies, TSP Radio

(Randy Johnson/AP)

(AP Photo/Rusty Kennedy)

Today I’ll compare arguably the two best left-handed pitchers of all-time in Major League history, and two of the best pitchers in general. First, I’ll list their career stats, in comparison, before I delve into specifics.

Carlton- 329-244 (.574%), 3.22 ERA, 4136 Ks, 5217.2 IP, 1833 BBs, 709 GS, 1.247 WHIP, 8.1 H/9, 0.7 HR/9, 3.2 BB/9, 7.1 K/9, 2.26 SO/BB
Johnson- 303- 166 (.646%), 3.29 ERA, 4875 Ks, 4135.1 IP, 1497 BBs, 603 GS, 1.171 WHIP, 7.3 H/9, 0.9 HR/9, 3.3 BB/9, 10.6 K/9, 3.26 SO/BB

Excluding wins, losses, and winning percentage; because I feel wins don’t represent how good/bad a pitcher was, because baseball’s a team sport; based on the stats above, they’re even at six apiece. If you take away/exclude totals, and base the comparison on averages, Johnson wins slightly 4-3 (WHIP, H/9, K/9, and SO/BB ratio).

Carlton pitched for 24 years; 15 of which were with Philadelphia, while Johnson pitched for 22. Since Johnson was traded mid-season twice, he played both 12 seasons in the AL and NL in his career, while Carlton pitched primarily in the National League with Philly and St. Louis.

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Top 10 Philly Athletes of the Past 50 Years: One Man’s View

February 19th, 2014 by Jim Chesko | Comments Off on Top 10 Philly Athletes of the Past 50 Years: One Man’s View | Filed in Baseball, Basketball, Eagles, Flyers, Football, Hockey, Phillies, Sixers, Sports, TalkSportsPhilly

Philadelphia’s been the home base for a great number of incredible athletes over the years, but who are the best of the best?

If you’re a faiBobby Clarke and Bernie Parentthful viewer of Comcast SportsNet (I admit, I’m a heavy watcher), you know that CSN has recently been counting down its list of the Top 10 Philly Athletes of all time. (In case you haven’t been paying attention, Numbers 10 through 4 were Bernie Parent, Chuck Bednarik, Carl Lewis, Julius Erving, Steve Van Buren, Joe Frazier and Steve Carlton; will the final trio be Clarkie, Schmidty and Wilt? We shall see.)

Anyway, it got me thinking about MY list. First, however, the parameters: I decided to limit my Top 10 to players whom I’ve seen in action during the past the 50 years and who’ve played the bulk of their career in Philadelphia. So, no Jimmie Foxx or Lefty Grove (way before my time), no Pete Rose (despite how much he meant to the Phils’ 1980 World Series team), no Steve van Buren or Chuck Bednarik (amazing careers for both, but – again – before my time), no Richie Ashburn … and no Kobe Bryant.

Before giving you my personal Top 10, how about a few Philly greats who just missed the cut? Getting “honorable mention” status would be Charles Barkley, Brian Dawkins and – although he spent just four of his prime NBA years as a 76er – Moses Malone. All right, here goes…

10) JOE FRAZIER – Philly’s greatest boxer, “Smokin’ Joe” was an Olympic gold medalist and undisputed World Heavyweight Champion from 1970 to 1972, who had those three memorable battles with Muhammad Ali. Career record of 32-4-1.

9) CARL LEWIS – The Willingboro, New Jersey, sprinter and long-jumper won nine Olympic gold medals and an additional eight World Championship gold medals in the 1980s and 90s. (We won’t penalize Lewis for his inglorious 1993 attempt at singing the national anthem at a Bulls-Nets NBA playoff game.)

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Why Steve Carlton Should Have Won the 1972 National League Most Valuable Player Award

January 19th, 2014 by Kyle Lutz | Comments Off on Why Steve Carlton Should Have Won the 1972 National League Most Valuable Player Award | Filed in Baseball, General, Phillies

Steve Carlton, arguably the Philadelphia Phillies’ best pitcher in franchise history, came into the league with St. Louis in 1965. He wasn’t drafted, but instead, out of college no less, signed with the team for $5,000 two years prior in 1963. From there he transformed over time into one of the best pitchers in baseball, and in hindsight one of the best of all-time.

His repertoire included a sweeping curveball, a powerful ‘mid-90s fastball and a late-breaking slider, which all proved to equally be his out pitches. After seven seasons with the Cardinals, he was traded in February of 1972 for fellow starting pitcher Rick Wisewho made the National League All-Star team a year prior to the trade (1971). Wise was a strong, top-of-the-order starting pitcher at the time. In 1971, he went 17-14 with an impressive ERA of 2.88 in 272.1 innings pitched. He only pitched two seasons with St. Louis before being traded again, after winning 16 games in succession; this time to Boston,

With St. Louis, Carlton had three seasons with below-3 ERAs. Although he led the league in losses (19) in 1970, the previous three seasons he compiled an ERA of 2.70, a win-loss record of 44-31 and a winning percentage of 59. In two of those three seasons he also made the All-Star team. His minor setbacks on the mound mixed with his contract demands (he wanted $65,000 from St. Louis, which they refused to pay him. They offered him $60,000 instead) the next two years led to his subsequent trade to Philly.

It was a strange, peculiar scenario for both players, as both teams were willing to pay the opposite team’s player the amount they wanted (both wanted $65,000), but yet they were unwilling to pay their own the same amount for unknown reasons.

Carlton’s Topps’ baseball card

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Why Steve Carlton Should Have Won the 1972 National League Most Valuable Player Award

January 12th, 2014 by Kyle Lutz | Comments Off on Why Steve Carlton Should Have Won the 1972 National League Most Valuable Player Award | Filed in Baseball, General, Phillies
(AP Photo/Rusty Kennedy)

(AP Photo/Rusty Kennedy)

Steve Carlton, arguably the Philadelphia Phillies’ best pitcher in franchise history, came into the league with St. Louis in 1965. He wasn’t drafted, but instead, out of college no less, signed with the team for $5,000 two years prior in 1963. From there he transformed over time into one of the best pitchers in baseball, and in hindsight one of the best of all-time.

His repertoire included a sweeping curveball, a powerful ‘mid-90s fastball and a late-breaking slider, which all proved to equally be his out pitches. After seven seasons with the Cardinals, he was traded in February of 1972 for fellow starting pitcher Rick Wise, who made the National League All-Star team a year prior to the trade (1971). Wise was a strong, top-of-the-order starting pitcher at the time. In 1971, he went 17-14 with an impressive ERA of 2.88 in 272.1 innings pitched. He only pitched two seasons with St. Louis before being traded again, after winning 16 games in succession; this time to Boston,

With St. Louis, Carlton had three seasons with below-3 ERAs. Although he led the league in losses (19) in 1970, the previous three seasons he compiled an ERA of 2.70, a win-loss record of 44-31 and a winning percentage of 59. In two of those three seasons he also made the All-Star team. His minor setbacks on the mound mixed with his contract demands (he wanted $65,000 from St. Louis, which they refused to pay him. They offered him $60,000 instead) the next two years led to his subsequent trade to Philly.

It was a strange, peculiar scenario for both players, as both teams were willing to pay the opposite team’s player the amount they wanted (both wanted $65,000), but yet they were unwilling to pay their own the same amount for whatever reason.

(more…)

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