Archive for the ‘MLB’ Category

Who’s the Best Phillies Catcher of All Time?

July 13th, 2019 by Philly Pressbox | 1 Comment | Filed in Baseball, General, MLB, Phillies

The boys are gathered at the Philly Pressbox for a few cold beverages and some baseball talk. We recently posted a note that it was Mike Lieberthals birthday and received both positive and negative comments about Lieby and him being honored on the Phillies Wall of Fame. That led us to the conversation of Who’s the Best Phillies Catcher of All Time. We quickly decided on the four finalists, Bob Boone, Darren Daulton, Leiberthal and Carlos Ruiz. This pretty much covers the last 40 years of full time Phillies catchers.

We’re going to provide some statistical information, as Phillies only, on each of the four and allow you, the fans, to vote on your favorite. The players are listed in alphabetical order.

BOB BOONE

Bob BooneBoonie was the Phillies full-time starting catcher from 1973-1981. He caught 1000+ games in 7 seasons.

He ranks 2nd to Lieberthal in games caught in the modern day with 1125. He caught 100+ games 7 times

He is 3rd in Batting Average, .259, behind Lieberthal and Ruiz.

He is 3rd in Home Runs, 65, behind Lieberthal and Daulton.

He ranks 3rd in RBI’s with 456.

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Steve Carlton vs. Mike Schmidt

June 26th, 2019 by Kyle Lutz | No Comments | Filed in Baseball, General, MLB, Phillies, Sports

Both are Hall-of-Famers, both are two of the best players in Phillies’ history and both had legendary careers, but who’s better? I feel Carlton is, for the record.

(Bill Ingraham/AP Photo)

The bias towards Schmidt in this town is interesting, especially since everybody hated him during his playing career. Now it’s the complete opposite, and not at a healthy medium either, like it probably should be. Sure, I love Schmidt myself for what he’s done for this organization, although I never got to see him play, unfortunately. And there’s no denying that he’s one of the best ever at the hot corner, if not the best; both offensively and defensively. Schmidt’s a likable guy as well, which makes it even easier to respect his playing-career accomplishments.

As for Carlton, he won 329 major-league games, 241 of them coming as a Phillie. He had a respectable winning percentage of 57.4, and struck out over 4,000 batters in 24 years in the majors. 15 out of his 24 major-league seasons were spent with Philadelphia, from 1972-86. Impressively, he won 20 or more games in his career six times, four of which culminated with a Cy-Young victory.

Carlton’s ranked 11th all-time in major-league victories, and second all-time among left handers (only Warren Spahn has more victories for a southpaw, with 363). Carlton became a first-ballot Hall-of-Famer in 1994, earning an impressive 95.6% of the vote. Schmidt was inducted a year later, earning a equally-impressive 96.5% of the vote, as a first-ballot Hall-of-Famer as well.

Individual accomplishments aside, back to the debate.

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Countdown to MLB Opening Day, Harper Time!

March 5th, 2019 by Leo | No Comments | Filed in Baseball, General, MLB, Phillies, TSP Radio




Phillies Roster

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Phillies sign Bryce, That’s Nice

March 1st, 2019 by Leo | No Comments | Filed in Baseball, General, MLB, Phillies

After months and months of talk here in the Philly area about signing Bryce Harper, finally the Phillies and Bryce signed a contract! The contract is for 13 years and $330 million dollars and Harper, 26, will be 39 when this contract runs out.  But the $25 million AAV of the deal means Harper could possibly be traded at some point in his career. After the announcement of the signing the Phillies sold over 100,000 tickets already for the upcoming season.

Harper has dominated the NL East throughout his career. He’s hit 96 home runs in his career vs. NL East opponents, with an OPS of .909.  In Harper’s 50 career games at Citizen’s Bank Park, he has a .930 OPS with 14 home runs.  With the most home runs being hit in Citizen’s Bank Park, that should mean the Phillies and the fans will have a lot to cheer about in the upcoming years. One thing that seems odd is a no opt-out in the contract, the Boras deal doesn’t have any opt-outs for the player or the Phillies.  Considering Boras typically adds that into the deals, you begin to wonder what actually happened behind closed doors while negotiating the contract.

Why did it take so long? Not really sure other than he was holding out for a better deal even though a lot of people felt deals of this magnitude as “stupid money”.  There are some concerns with Harper’s career so far, he has missed time with injuries, he’s amounted to fewer than 2.0 bWAR in three of his seven big-league seasons. Harper has had inconsistent defense and he struck out a career-high 169 times in 2018.

It should be interesting to see how Harper is received in Washington this year and what other moves the Phillies will make in their bid to win the NL East.  If you would like to check out Harper’s stats you can see them on the Baseball Reference site.  By signing the biggest contract ever you know he made some kind of history, Harper surpasses Giancarlo Stanton for total contract value.  Stanton signed a $325 million extension with the Miami Marlins but Harper will probably hold this title for quite some time.

Some other notable links to brush up on your Harper stats and information, here is a list:

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Roy Halladay elected to the Hall of Fame

January 23rd, 2019 by Leo | No Comments | Filed in Baseball, General, MLB, Phillies

Here in Philly we are all familiar with the tragic loss of Roy Halladay after a plane crash in 2017.  We were all saddened after a long and fantastic career in the MLB, 12 years with the Toronto Blue Jays and 4 years with the Phillies including a Perfect game in 2010.

The Baseball Writers Association of America officially released its 2019 Hall of Fame voting results. there were four players who will be inducted into Cooperstown this July: pitchers Mariano Rivera, Roy Halladay and Mike Mussina, as well as designated hitter Edgar Martinez.

Of course we here in Philly and Toronto were happy to see Roy made the HOF on the first ballot.   During his 16-year career, he won two Cy Young Awards and played in eight All-Star Games. He also won 203 games and figures to be remembered as one of the old school hard working pitcher thanks in part to his 250-inning season in 2010.

Here is an image of his stats over his career that can be referenced at the Baseball Reference website.

Although it has a bittersweet taste, Roy Halladay’s surviving widow and 2 children released a statement after his induction into the HOF that his son Braden wrote.

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Countdown to MLB Opening Day

March 13th, 2018 by Leo | Comments Off on Countdown to MLB Opening Day | Filed in Baseball, General, MLB, Phillies, Sports



Countdown til MLB Opening Day…


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Cubs Win World Series 2016

November 2nd, 2016 by Kyle Lutz | Comments Off on Cubs Win World Series 2016 | Filed in Baseball, MLB, Sports

It was a 108-year wait. That any American was alive the last time the Chicago Cubs won the World Series is extremely unlikely. Any person with a living memory of it would have to be older than 110. Still, there are plenty of long-time Cubs fans who have waited their entire lives for this moment, and with an 8–7 win over the Cleveland Indians in Game 7 of the World Series, they finally get to celebrate.

For Indians fans, they now have the dubious distinction of being devotees of the team with the longest World Series drought, 68 years. Baseball fans were treated to one of the best World Series of all time and a Game 7 classic that proved once again that baseball, of all the major sports, including football, basketball, and hockey, is the purest among them. The reason is that it has no clock.

As a result, baseball is often the sport defined by particular moments. It is not a slight against other sports. The Miracle on Ice hockey game between the United States and the USSR in the 1980 winter Olympics is one of the most celebrated moments in sports history. The Cleveland Cavaliers coming back from a 1–3 deficit against the Golden State Warriors to deliver the city of Cleveland a professional-sports championship for the first time since 1964 was amazing. The New York Giants beating the previously undefeated New England Patriots in Super Bowl XLII is one of the great upsets in football history. All of those games, however, relied on a clock. The other teams lost because they simply ran out of time. In baseball, the game is not over until the last man is out.

Perhaps nothing illustrates this better than the 2011 World Series between the Texas Rangers and the St. Louis Cardinals. Going into Game 6, the Texas Rangers led the series 3–2 and were on the verge of winning the first World Series. On two occasions, the Rangers were not just one inning or one out but one strike away from winning it all. Both times, in the ninth and and then the tenth inning, the Cardinals found a way to come back and tie the game. The Cardinals ultimately won, in the eleventh inning, thanks to a walk-off home run by David Freese. The Cardinals won Game 7 to complete the comeback. SLIDESHOW: Cubs Win World Series One strike away. Baseball will forever be defined by these moments. Bobby Thomson’s Shot Heard Round the World, lifting the New York Giants past the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1951. Joe Carter’s walk-off home run, against the Phillies’ Mitch Williams, in the 1993 World Series. Carlton Fisk, waving his arms to will his fly ball to to left field to stay fair for a walk-off home run against the Cincinnati Reds in Game 6 of the 1975 World Series. Derek Jeter’s walk-off home run in Game 5 of the 2001 World Series, three minutes after the clock struck midnight, marking the first time in history a World Series game was played in November. The list could go on for quite some time.

All of these moments were possible because nobody ever had to look at a clock and think, “We’re running out of time.” How different would Game 7 between the Cubs and Indians have been had the Cubs taken a 6–3 lead with only two minutes left to play? There would be no comeback. Indians fans would have started filing out of Progressive Field. The Cubs would do what they could to run out the clock and win the World Series. But it doesn’t work that way. Instead, the Indians came back to tie the game. The Cubs scored two more runs. The Indians closed within one, but, alas, it was not enough. Baseball fans were treated to a smiling Kris Bryant (I do suspect Cleveland Indians fans were hoping he fell down), fielding what would be the final out of the World Series. There was no clock. It was just Bryant, grinning from ear to ear as he threw to first base, erasing 108 years of frustration for Cubs fans — and preserving 68 years of the same for the Indians. It was one of those baseball moments that will not be forgotten.

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